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>>> making mice. japanese researchers push the the boundaries of reproductive technology to produce life in vitro. scientists the world over are experimenting with the origins of life. researchers in japan have made a breakthrough in the field. then they produce mice through in vitro fertilization. researchers at kyoto university took the cells of female mice to generate stem cells. they applied protein to them to develop what are called germ cells. the researchers transplanted the germ cells into ovaries. they succeeded into producing the cells. they fertilized the ova with normal sperm. they placed the fertilized eggs in female mice, and they waited, and then the mice did what the team had hoped for, they gave birth to normal offspring. >> translator: we are reproducing the mechanisms of sperm and ova in test tubes. research on chromosomes has helped identify the cause of infertility. this achievement will improve our chances of finding a cure. >> the group succeeded last year in generating mouse sperm from ips cells. cyto says researchers need to be what they do next. >>> the kyo
and u.s. technology giants have been fighting each other in the courts over technology for smartphones and other mobile devices. the people at samsung say they added iphone 5, apple's iphone 5 to a patent infringement lawsuit. samsung alleges the latest smartphone violates eight of its patents. the claim targets technologies for displays data and storing photos. lawyers for samsung say they will exclude patents on the high speed wireless communications protocol known as lte. samsung has an edge in this technology. samsung received a green light from a u.s. district court in california in another case. the company can resume sales of its tablet device the galaxy 10.1 in the u.s. market. the court decided in june to temporarily ban sales. it lifted the injunction after a separate lawsuit in august found this particular tablet did not infringe on apple patents. >>> in other news ahmadinejad blamed the enemies of iran for the fall of its currency. u.s. and european leaders imposed sanctions in july to encourage them to abandon the nuclear missions. >> translator: sanctions are used as a ps
moving into equitieequities. what do you make of technology here? that was the leader on the up side. do you still want to be a buyer at these levels? >> maria, my favorite sectors are financials and industrials. i do like apple. it's our favorite technology pick. overall, i'd be neutral on the technology sector. >> erin, let me get your take on that. who do you like right now? you're cautious on this market. you want to play it safe, but who do you like? >> right now i'm looking at a lot of consumer discretionary, particularly companies that are more focussed with their sales in the u.s. versus europe, so not having that international exposure. one of my favorites, we love those telecoms. >> still paying the dividend. keep the income stream going. all right, folks. nice to talk with all of you. >> thanks, bill. >> steve and rick, get along, would you? okay. where were we, maria? how's san francisco? >> everything's good. it's gorgeous here. i didn't realize how hot it would be. we're following the oracle story. they made some big announcements here about the cloud. we have a market that
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and testimony in -- this new technology in place, and we have a major position of leadership, but that's not an excuse. this is an excuse that congress has not provided one in the policy, or, two, the funding. both are many place, and now what we need is moving forward, and, again, making certain that the hardware, the software, the systems, and the equipment, and all of the above, as they -- are they -- as they are developed that they are also deployed in an expeditious fashion. another point i want to make here, too, and i will do everything i can to keep faa out of the development of the technology itself. faa should not be developing this technology or step in the way of its development. this, we've seen time and time again that the private sector does a better job. we've got to keep the private sector in the forefront with somebody making the decisions and meeting the milestones, and, again, the blueprint that's been set out by law so we will hold this hearing, additional hearing, and hold faa's feet to the fire, the safety of the flying public, the future of aviation relies on th
business challenge, dell has the technology and services to help you solve it. gerri: you thought the obamacare issue was settled? think again. why the supreme court is taking of the case again. don't go away. gerri: well, the supreme court back in session for the first five sets up of obamacare as the law of the land. the president's landmark health care law may still come back to the high court. peter barnes is in d.c. with all the latest. >> reporter: well, the court issued an order today about a case called liberty university versus a geithner, secretary of the treasury. kind of under the radar. and now this case was a direct challenge to obamacare a couple of years ago. liberty university was one of the first organizations to file suit to try to stop it. a court of appeals shot down the case because of the anti in junction act of 1867. remember that? we talked about it at nauseam. the law that was passed after the civil war this said that a taxpayer cannot sue the government over any tax. in june even though the court upheld obamacare on a regular tax law, the high court rule
% of the time. consumer staples did win the trade today. over the last 20 years, technology has been the best performing s&p sector in the fourth quarter, up more than 7% on average. that makes sense since qe 4 is about that important holiday season. energy and utilities are the two most underperforming sectors in q4 over the past 20 years. so with the recent run-up in the market, are there still opportunities in the strong performing tech and consumer discretionary groups? one of our cnbc masters found tech trading at deep discounts in relation to historical averages. take a look at this. ebay's p/e average 50% its historical average below. intel, 47% below its historical average p/e ratio. 94% below its historical average. that's the best performer of the group followed by ad agency interpublic with a p/e ratio 62% its historical average. there could be room to run in some of these names. we'll have to wait and see until all of this plays out to come. maria, back to you. >> all right, court, thank you so much. we'll be watching that. courtney reagan. stick around. we have a lot more headed
due to a decrease in technology spending worldwide. oil falling well below 9500 in terms of slowing demand. the impact of china and drop in oil prices making the energy sector the worst performing sector today. oil settling down by $3.75. i am here filling in for liz claman because liz claman is in cleveland, of ohio. her old stomping ground as part of the open for business series and liz will talk to business leaders to find out how the city turned itself around. we want to know. give us a preview. liz: is part of our fox business series open for business. how could cleveland not be? this is the place. i just landed and got to the ritz hotel and saw jimmy page in the elevator. i am kidding but this is the home of rock-and-roll. it is where the term rock-and-roll was coined but also where the traffic light was invented and the alkaline battery and a gas mask and electric light system. so much industry began here and so much is happening here. wait till you see what we are going to do the next two days. starting tomorrow through friday cleveland opened for business. we have got every
different, very successful businesses in finance, in manufacturing, and in technology when i chaired the panel for the clinton global initiative. they are lloyd blankfein, the chairman and ceo of goldman sachs, andrew liveris, the president, chairman and ceo of dow chemical, and john chambers, the chairman and ceo of cisco. the conversation was fascinating. listen in. >>> lloyd, let me start with you. when you look at the global economy, right now, you know, what is it, four years after the crash, what does it look like to you? >> well, we're definitely in a muddle-through phase, slow growth, very disappointing. but i think one of the things that was achieved -- and by the way, in hindsight it may look small but while we were living through it, it was very large. there was a substantial chance too substantial to live with of things falling off the rail. they're still out there, and a lot of the things that would foster growth are still uncertain and are still, you know, frankly they're still in the forward. but i think what was taken off the table recently by the -- frankly by the ce
tomorrow to discuss their risks technology poses to the markets to stocks and to investing. hey, you remember the flash crash of may 2010. it said the dow plunging nearly 1,000 points in a matter of minutes. more recently over the summer when trading glitch caused the company called night capitol $440 million. so, what does this mean for you and me and all the other small investors? former sec chairman tried to renounce. thank you for being with us today. i appreciated. are you expecting much from this rental? >> i am expecting there to be a spirited discussion, but in terms of results i think there will be very little that comes out of it at this particular juncture. the goal is really to educate the commissioners and staff and start focusing on some sensible ways in which some of these technology glitches can be capped ended. gerri: educate the staff. high-frequency trading has be around for awhile. it sms to me these folks should know everything about it. why don't they? >> i think there is clearly a lag tim between when government becomes aware of technological advances and when
goals because we have eight years ahead of us and we have seen another -- seen in other technological fields that these things can be packed -- picked up at a rapid pace. >> emission-free vehicles cost more than their gas guzzling counterparts and only have a limited range. while there makers focus on advancing battery technology -- while their makers focus on advancing battery technology, the government rejects further subsidies. >> we'll work hard to achieve this in fields -- in the field of research and development. >> the government says it would be happy to get 600,000 electric cars on the road in the next few years, but experts say even that is an ambitious goal. >> sports news, one of the greatest comebacks in golf history. europe had miraculously managed to keep their hands on the ryder cup. >> they fought their way back to beat the u.s. 14 1/2 to 13 1/2 in illinois. >> germany's martin kaymer sealed the deal with his victory over steve stricker. >> team europe chipped, drove, and putted their way into the history books. the americans inched back into the game, but europe's ju
their top position in the country's auto market. >>> technology has changed our daily lives fundamentally over the past century and more. who can now imagine life without electric light bulbs or more recently smartphones? to answer the question of what the next technological game maker might be, we went to one of japan's largest home electronics shows. nhk world's ta mow coca mata gives us the inside line. >> reporter: more than 600 companies are participating in this exhibition at a site near tokyo. major japanese electronics firms such as sony are presenting their latest products at the show which began on tuesday. visitors are interested. this is what walking may look like in the future. just a slight hand pressure of my hand. electronics manufacturer murata has a small company that specializes in devices to assist the elderly and infirm. nearly a quarter of the japanese population is now over 65 years of age. there's a growing market for products for the elderly, and manufacturers are becoming increasingly innovative. >> translator: i think the senior market will expand as the numbers
actually make the impact and turn our technology in to a reality that could help a billion people. >> you are in 200 countries. >> 206. as noble as the cause of providing clean drinking water is, think of what we are doing as much broader and bigger. think of the units we will place in these rural villages, towns as kiosks, small kiosks that will actually house this machine and will have even small refrigerators that can keep vaccines, essential medicines in that town, a tv screen that will be operated by solar sustainable power where people can converge and watch news and charge their phones where they didn't have a place to charge their phones and these units will be connected on broad band. it is actually i think one of the most exciting golden triangles in action of business, government, civil society working together. >> how did you come up with this idea, dean? what led you to this? >> actually i didn't start out to make potable or drinking water for the developing world. i have been working for decades now producing dialysis equipment. one of the items to make that technology, that
modern technology, for us to respond to that hateful speech and powers and the individual who engages in such a speech to create chaos around the world. we empower the worst of us if that is how we respond. more broadly, the advance of the last two weeks also speak to the need for all of us to honestly and then -- to address the tensions between the west and the arab world which is moving toward democracy. let me be clear. just as we cannot solve every problem in the world, the united states has not and will not seek to dictate the outcome of democratic transitions abroad. we do not expect other nations to agree with us on every issue. nor do we assume that the violence of the past weeks or the hateful speech by some individuals represent the views of the overwhelming majority of muslims. any more than the views of the people who produced these -- who produced this video represent the views of america. however, i do believe that it is the obligation of all leaders in all countries to speak out forcefully against violence and extremism. [applause] it is time to marginalize those who, e
and travel even with high-tech use the technology inaction. to use the cellphones technology, the cat scan and a hospital, and the amount of innovation we could offer israel is amazing. it is a great place to live to bring up your family. to talk about the challenges is something we could be very proud of. but we need to stand up united to get to a point* to find a viable partner to speak about the peaceful agreement that is mike -- what i talk about conflict management not conflict resolution. the oslo accord big supporters of the environment. think about the amount of paper when redrafted the accord. but today we speak of the leadership. for example, according to the oslo accord is available with everyone to pray but it is not safe. we cannot go there. it is not safe. i do not believe in another ceremony at the white house but to and until we get to the point* you have to manage the conflict i want to sum up to tell you the book is very street. they said you are making a mistake if you raise something in a book now what will happen in a few years? people will say 182 about that and what
that they were in merger talks. the question now is, these are two companies with separate technology standards and this is early similar to sprint and nextel and what happened with that? i don't know if you can call that a resounding success? >> reporter: no, that is, of course, one of the worst deals of all time, under that unglorious pantheon. but the technology across all of their networks and be a fourth competitor in the wireless business. but we'll see. interesting deal by all measures. many people may be looking at this and saying, well, deutsch telekom has created a currency, they are in a position to finance and capitalize this company but also may have a chance to exit as a result of the selling down of the stake. another story is sprint, as you guys all know, i have reported back in february a deal that was hours away from being completed when sprint's board stepped in and said, no, we don't want you to buy metro pcs. perhaps it was right to have walked away but still out there in terms of at least a question as we watch consolidation of some kind in wirele but not what many people
performing sectors. technology and telecom lagged. u.s. manufacturing activity rose for the first time in four months in september. it rose to 51.5 from 46.6 in august. readings indicate a bit of expanding economic activity. construction spending fell in august for the second month in a row posting its biggest decrease in more than a year. construction spending dropped 0.6% in august. lauren: we are live in indianapolis with a look at ben bernanke's market moving speech today. scott bower in the pits of the cme and john manly says why it's time to buy into some european markets, huh, i don't know. we got to get to that. rich edson, mr. ben bernanke had a strong message to congress, to the markets, but -- go ahead -- there was a message for main street. tell us about that. >> yeah, he did. a number number of different wae put it, a big defense for qe3 and the monetary policy has been pursuing this in response to the fox business network. the u.s. is not in a recession now. he's worried about stagnation, not monetizing the debt. he says they'll sell asset off, and they expect to keep pol
value losers in all technology for 2012. going to get reaction to the hp news today later on in the program. first, let's look at where we stand. the dow jones industrial average flat on the session, down about 6 3/4 points. the nasdaq in positive territory, although it, too, having given up a fair amount of gains now with a showing of 7 1/2 points on the upside. s&p 500 up just a fraction. >> so it looks like more and more like the big gains we saw after the fed's lt announcement for qe-3 are now wearing off for investors. all major averages are pretty much flat since the fed announced more stimulus measures in september. >> if that's not going to get investors buying, what will? quint tetro is with us. also joining us is vincent of morgan stanley and jeff cox and our own rick santelli. quint, you see a top in the general market and the fed stimulus was a sell event? >> yeah, it was, marimaria. we got a ramp into what was very telegraphed quantitative easing three. we have not seen the enthusiasm continue as we had in the past. but there's some market signals that are tra
area for the firm. >> what about technology? you know, larry ellison yesterday talking about growth from the cloud. that's obviously one of the themes within tech. what where are you seeing nunt tech? >> technology in the u.s. is 15% of our market cap. it's 3% in europe. it's a core competency in the u.s. what i think is happening right now is remember in 1998 the world turned down, but it was asia that was in trouble. the central banks put liquidity in and technology did well, particularly growth stocks. my view right now is instead of asia being in trouble, it's europe, but people are going to migrate towards some of the good growth stocks. you've seen that in names, you know, some of the bigger cap technology names. i would be very focused on things that have yield growth and inflation hedging. i would focus on the technology sector. as we have a bumpy ride on economic growth globally, i think public investors are going to migrate towards those names. >> you finding growth in europe? >> growth is tough to come by in europe. >> just wanted to throw that out there. always nice to s
build technology that lets users share what they want to share and that's tremendously exciting. >> julia will join us with more of that conversation coming up at 7:30. and we'll find out why craig barrett is not a facebook fan. and in sports news, yes, europe has retained the ryder cup. staging a comeback after the u.s. began sunday with a big lead. europe has won five of the last six matches. this was a heartbreak for anyone watching this. we'll talk more about that a little later this half hour. but first before we get to all of that, andrew has this morn g morning's other top stories. >> we have global data this morning and not all of it that great. eurozone manufacturing reporting its worsts quarterly performance since the depths of the great recession. factories were hit by falling nand. survey suggests that the downturn began in smaller periphery countries has now taken root in core members including germany and france. speaking of europe, an expert group will present its findings to the eu commission, that's coming tomorrow. the proposal could recommend european banks s
, pnc has technology, guidance, and over 150 years of experience to help you get there. ♪ [ male announcer ] the exceedingly nimble, ridiculously agile, tight turning, fun to drive 2013 smart. ♪ >>> good morning. welcome back to -- miles is here. this is the neighborhood. >> you're schooling me on this, but i love it. >> if you like them, you're a hoodlum. >> you have a great ear. you picked the last huge indy song that went over and crossed over. >> what was it, she did a -- mac, what wases that? yeah, she did another. >> the details and sultsity isu. i didn't hear that. >> welcome back. i'm joe kernen. miles is in andrew's seat. who it says he's on assignment. i think he's in therapy today. if you're just waking up, we're talking about reaction to the first presidential debate last night. unknown, unclear whether it's a game changer at this point. among the issues discussed, health care. >> when you look at obamacare, the congressional budget office has said it will cost 2500 a year more than traditional insurance. >> if you preel obamacare, and i have become fond of this ter
the green but financials technology was the biggest lagger. the economy added 14,000 jobs in september narrowly beating the economist estimates. the unemployment rate went the other direction and for the first time in forty-four months dropping to 7.8% from 8.9%. we get into details of that. a lot of people are skeptical. bold falling from an 11 month high following the september jobs report. oppresses metal jumped $17.95 before settling at $1,080 an ounce. let's get today's action from the pits of the cme. paul desmond will tell us why you need to watch small caps carefully. michael gives his talk for year's end. let's start with a lot and the jobs numbers. i am curious. the cme traders are very skeptical people by nature. they have to be because there are so many people selling stuff. do they believe the numbers when they came out? >> that was the most interesting thing. most of the traders were expecting that number of unemployment data to the 8.1% and job data below the 110,000 and when it came out the initial reaction was cover your shorts right away. this is an amazing incredible
: and how technology is making it possible for doctors to go paperless. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: the first day of the new quarter, kicks off with a blue chip rally. investors were encouraged by a report showing that american factories were busy in september. a popular index of national factory activity rose to 51.5 last month, from 49.6 in august. it was the fastest pace of production since may. but that upbeat news was overshadowed by comments from federal reserve chief ben bernanke, saying the economy is not growing fast enough to bring down the unemployment rate. we'll have more on that in a moment. those two events led to volatile trading here on wall street. the dow rose about 78 points, but was up as much as 155 points earlier. the nasdaq drifted in and out of positive and negative territory, finally losing more than 2.5 points, and the s&p rose almost four points. and, as suzanne pratt reports there are conflicting views on the state of american manufacturing. >> reporter: from cardboard boxmakers, to icemakers, to uniform manufacturers, factories across t
your fans as a result of their technological paralysis. >> would you have a better. you have to prove! >> you are basically a menonite. >> yes, i am a mennonite. >> is it dangerous to listen to sam cook and dance? >> just like kelly mcgillis. >> oh, yes. the optics for google is surpassing them in 2010. since last october it hasn't gone away. >> what about ten years? we put it up yesterday. that's optics right there. >> the ten-year looks like dead money and then it shows money from the dead money. but it has not gone anywhere. it can't go past -- you still cash coming in enormously fr. >> the closed model you had was okay, but i'm similaring here dealing with microsoft. i have to deal with them. apple, they will solve that problem. once in the organization and another plays defense. it is not the bears' defense. it is more the jets. you know what they are? they are on the punt pass. the season is over. >> two games left. >> there's a pup blast, a physically unable to perform list and microsoft is on the pup list. hewlett-packard is on there, dallas i.r. is there. >> are they career-e
... ♪ into a high-tech mastpiece? ♪ whatever your business challenge, dell has the technology and services to help you solve it. man on tv: ...rbis and 36 homers. swings at the first pitch and fouls it deep back into the stands. [ding] [fans whirring] announcer: chill raw and prepared foods promptly. one in 6 americans will get sick from food poisoning this year. check your steps at foodsafety.gov. >> now, a couple of moments ago, almost chokingly getting a romney rally on the stock market. of course, the widespread opinion is that governor romney won the debate last night and it's absolutely true to say that the stock market will open higher this morning, we're expecting a gain of 40, maybe 50 points, when that opening bell stops ringing and the trading day starts. [bell ringing] would you call that a romney rally? i'm not serious popping this. is it a pure coincidence, i'm not sure, but some people will say this is a romney rally. we will be discussing that later on. and check the big board since the trading day has now begun and the opening trend is indeed to the upside. we're expecting, 40, 5
... ♪ into a fifth anniversary of remission? ♪ whatever your business challenge, dell has the technology and services to help you solve it. ♪ >>> you know that theme song, don't you? it's bond, james bond. while today's bond is walking around in kos tom made tom ford suits, the guitarist here, you could say he got the short end of the stick. vic flick was paid just $15 for his iconic guitar rift. from sean connery to daniel craig what are your favorite james bond moments and kraergt s characters? the movie series turned 50. >> what are you having? >> i'll have a vodka martini, shaken, not stirred. >> do you expect me to talk? >> no, mr. bond, i expect you to die. terror me, the best bond villain of all time is goldfinger. he is obsessed with gold. you would think somebody like that would be easy for james bond to foil but he actually gets smarter as the film goes along. >> i'll never find another girl like you. will you marry me? >> the best bond girl, tracy. she's the woman that bond marries. she has everything that you could want in a great bond woman character. she's brilliant, she's strong, she
component of this company given these significant changes that are taking place in technology? >> yeah. well, first of all, i think the desire for people to compute, to create, to share, to communicate is actually not shrinking. it's growing. and so the personal computing devices, i think, are going to continue to grow. and, of course, you know, even the classic notebooks, our new thin and light notebook like the specter xt, we've had tremendous response to that. so we're going to have a full line of offerings from work stations to desktops to notebooks. and then, of course, we're entering into the tablet category, too, but not as just a simple tablet, a convertible where you can have the benefits of a laptop plus the benefits of a pure tablet. and then one thing i'm very excited about is our elite pad which is the first tablet designed specifically for the enterprise. it has serviceability. it has what we call smart jackets that allow you to customize that tablet for your industry. when you put the smart jacket on, it goes from the ten-hour battery life that's built into the tablet to anoth
and their guests. >> i really specialize in technology and helping those small technology companies through the process. >> you find that champion for your cause and you ride that for all its worth. >> reporter: our cameras were allowed along on actual lobby visits, being conducted most any time congress is in session. davis is such a familiar face in the halls of the capitol, republican congresswoman mary bono mack greets him with a kiss. >> lobbyists trade on -- if you want to use the bad word -- trade on friendships. >> excuse me. this is a won woman. >> do i ever ask a friend to do something contrary to their values and judgment on the facts? never. >> you know i've been a friend of the congressman for many years. >> i do. reporter: today they're paying a call on pennsylvania democratic congresswoman. >> that's why i try to make sure my door is open to everyone. and that we get the right information so we can make the best decisions. >> reporter: there are two components to successful lobbying. access and money. donations from lobbyists and their clients to members of congress. while it
, and that help us get out on the cutting edge of the new technologies that will create millions of new jobs. because, when we sell these new products here, we'll then be able to sell them overseas. there is a ravenous demand for them overseas. now, another big difference is governor bush is proposing to open up some of our most precious environmental treasures, like the arctic national wildlife refuge for the big oil companies to go in and start producing oil there. i think that is the wrong choice. it would only give us a few months' worth of oil and the oil wouldn't start flowing for many years into the future. i don't think it's a fair price to pay to destroy precious parts of america's environment. we have to bet on the future and move beyond the current technologies to have a whole new generation of more efficient, cleaner, energy technology. >> it's an issue i know a lot about. i was a small oil person for a while in west texas. this is an administration that's had no plan. and all of a sudden the results of having no plan have caught up with america. first and foremost we have to ful
and outside. all of us have thoughts and suggestions to offer and some have technological expertise to land or policy expertise as well but it doesn't have to be done internally and it's terrifying when the government says we are here to help you. we are from the transparency community. we are here to help house well. with that i would like to thank all of the panelists. i would like to thank representative fisa and -- issa and quigly. please visit transparentycaucess for the next event and thank you all so much. [applause] i want to raise an issue that has been for two or three weeks specifically on the national security terms. you already are the oldest president in history and some of your staff say you were tired after your most recent encounter with mr. mondale. i recall president kennedy had to go days on end with bear minimum sleep during the cuban missile crisis. is there any doubt in your mind you would be able to function in such circumstances? >> not at all. i want you to know also that i will not make age an issue of this campaign. i am not going to exploit for political purpose
challenge, dell has the technology and services to help you solve it. whatever your business challenge, and get 3 years interest-free financing on tempur-pedic. but hurry, sleep train's inventory clearance sale ends columbus day. ♪ your ticket to a better night's sleep ♪ >>> the jobs report, of course, the main driver of the market today. so how is it possible we only added 114,000 jobs last month, which doesn't even keep up with population growth? but we had such a steep decline in the unemployment rate. senior economics reporter steve liesman is here to explain. the mystery, what is it? >> it's really the product, as you know. we have two separate surveys. the household survey, that's where we get the unemployment rate. it's the result of a nationwide survey of around 60,000 people. sounds big, right? well, it's historically very volatile. the payroll survey, that's where we get the number of jobs, the 114,000. that comes from a survey of around 140,000 employers. they submit actual data. it's favored by economists because it's steadier. but guess what? it's also subject to revis
and -- that was unable to cross across a land of the voyages of the development of technology will let shortened the distance it did not negate geography. it needed more precious and important as it opened up a new geography to the world conflict system and world trade system. culture and economics and people flow from the geography because what is culture? the accumulated experience of people on the landscape over hundreds of thousands of years that leads to the traditions and habits that can be identifiable. one of the places i have the a identifiable culture is remaining. nobody can mistake that there is a remaining culture that's been formed by the conflict between the invaders coming from central europe and those coming from the plateau which fostered a suspicious character you can see into the politics in this day and i can go through every country where many countries and talk about that. >> talk a moment about germany, one of the arresting images in the book is your description were quoting the german historian who call the germany a big prison meaning was caught between the north sea's
. >> did you see that kodak got rid of what was supposed to be a superior technology -- >> in terms of printers. >> yeah. i had a kodak printer and i thought it was magnificent. >> printing was made one of the focuses. we saw the printer here. this is what's going to turn around kodak. the company in chapter 11 trying to reorganize. but they're getting out of it entirely. >> such a great profit center. but doesn't seem to matter. >> melissa mentions the citi call, the mcdonald's call, the marriott call. these analysts are -- it's not that they're down on the stock all of a sudden. it's that they're reweighing the risk/reward, we keep seeing that, the balance of risk/reward. >> it's what we started with. they can't come out and say, stick with marriott or stick with microsoft because the fed is easing. they have to deal with what i used to call because i was an art history guy in college, the four walls of the canvas. and they can't go outside of it. they're more rembrandt than they are cessa. >> i'm making i'm sure in the right century. >> good. >> they're not polak necessarily. >>
business challenge, dell has the technology and services to help you solve it. since then, there's been one wedding, 2 kids, and 43 bottles of olay total effects. so in spite of 185 tantrums 378 pre-dawn starts and a lot of birthdays, caroline still looks amazing. you can challenge what's possible thanks to the trusted performance of olay. 60 years, millions of women, real results. 60 years, millions of women, i'm bara ck o bama and i approve romney: "it's time to stand up to the cheaters" vo: tough on china? not mitt romney. when a flood of chinese tires threatened a thousand american jobs... it was president obama who stood up to china and protected american workers. mitt romney attacked obama's decision... said standing up to china was "bad for the nation and our workers." how can mitt romney take on the cheaters... when he's taking their side? >>> 5:43 in the morning. a live picture of the plaza outside of rockefeller center. let's get a check of the weather from bill karins. >> happy together. >> and to you, sir. >> rain continues in the southeast, a storm exiting northern new england
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